I am a twenty-something year-old university student of Natural Resource Management. This blog is of the anything that strikes my fancy variety.

Interests include Celtic Thunder, Doctor Who, Harry Potter, Big Bang Theory, NCIS, the Tortall universe, The Hunger Games, and books in general.

I also blog about ADHD, learning disabilities, mental health, animals, science...

22nd August 2014

Post reblogged from Welcome to my domain. with 366,515 notes

javeliner:

think about the concept of a library. that’s one thing that humanity didn’t fuck up. we did a good thing when we made libraries

22nd August 2014

Photoset reblogged from If looks were blowtorches, you'd have no eyebrows with 36,363 notes

enchanter-of-brazening:

We’re in love and we’re REALLY ANNOYED ABOUT IT

Source: catelyn-stark

22nd August 2014

Photo reblogged from "Behave..." with 490,705 notes

highlyfunctioning-fangirl:

starfleetrambo:

xshiromorix:

capt-james-t-kirk:

supernaturalfan1:

underthestarssofaraway:


I like how everyone seems like they’re dead tired and Thor’s just there going'om nom nom this is a shawarma nom nom nom'

Notice how Clint and Natasha seemed to have appropriated half of each others’ chairs.

and I think Tony is just realizing that he literally died and was scared back to life by the man to his left

and steve, being the senior citizen, is simply nodding off

Also, the dude behind the counter just nonchalantly making shawarma for the goddamn Avengers like they come in every day.

#meanwhile loki is outside tied to the bike rack with mjolnir on his chest

I’ve reblogged this about five times already and I dont plan on stopping

highlyfunctioning-fangirl:

starfleetrambo:

xshiromorix:

capt-james-t-kirk:

supernaturalfan1:

underthestarssofaraway:

I like how everyone seems like they’re dead tired and Thor’s just there going
'om nom nom this is a shawarma nom nom nom'

Notice how Clint and Natasha seemed to have appropriated half of each others’ chairs.

and I think Tony is just realizing that he literally died and was scared back to life by the man to his left

and steve, being the senior citizen, is simply nodding off

Also, the dude behind the counter just nonchalantly making shawarma for the goddamn Avengers like they come in every day.

#meanwhile loki is outside tied to the bike rack with mjolnir on his chest

I’ve reblogged this about five times already and I dont plan on stopping

Source: captainmatsuoka

22nd August 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Thunder Games with 16,093 notes

pleatedjeans:

You should follow @blindchow

Source: pleatedjeans

22nd August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Ramblings of Mine with 179,499 notes

fairytailsfireball:

almost-never-lively:

officialwumbo:

agirlnamedagnes:

This is what my husband and I purchased at the grocery store the other day.

We don’t have kids.

We are adults. We pay bills.
And drink water from a whale.

Money whale spent 

get out

I want it!

Source: agirlnamedagnes

22nd August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Ramblings of Mine with 448,606 notes

huffingtonpost:

People have offered many potential explanations for this discrepancy, but this ad highlights the importance of the social cues that push girls away from math and science in their earliest childhood years.

Watch the powerful Verizon advertisement to really understand what a little girl hears when you tell her she’s pretty.

Source: youtube.com

22nd August 2014

Photo reblogged from Ramblings of Mine with 261,943 notes

lifehackable:

This is potentially life saving information everyone should know.

lifehackable:

This is potentially life saving information everyone should know.

Source: lifehackable.com

10th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Ramblings of Mine with 380,855 notes

commodifiedsouls:

sauronsoreboobs:

decodethefallenmoon:

wafflesforstephanie:

geth-metal:

frostbackscat:

Oh my god if you’re going to judge someone’s cosplay you better learn your fucking shit because this is Duela Dent you goddamn assholes.


AHAHAHA
Perpetually laughing over the fact that “real gamer/comic book nerd” males keep insulting women for cosplaying things they’ve never even heard of 
who’s the “fake geek” now, fuckers? 

Make it viral

WOULD YOU LIKE SOME ICE FOR THAT BURN MEME-MAKER

I’ve seen this and reblogged this before but i’ll do it again because “real nerds,” can be such fucking ass holes.

Always reblog nerds being put in their place.

commodifiedsouls:

sauronsoreboobs:

decodethefallenmoon:

wafflesforstephanie:

geth-metal:

frostbackscat:

Oh my god if you’re going to judge someone’s cosplay you better learn your fucking shit because this is Duela Dent you goddamn assholes.

AHAHAHA

Perpetually laughing over the fact that “real gamer/comic book nerd” males keep insulting women for cosplaying things they’ve never even heard of 

who’s the “fake geek” now, fuckers? 

Make it viral

WOULD YOU LIKE SOME ICE FOR THAT BURN MEME-MAKER

I’ve seen this and reblogged this before but i’ll do it again because “real nerds,” can be such fucking ass holes.

Always reblog nerds being put in their place.

Source: cosplay-paradise

10th August 2014

Photo reblogged from My Whovian Life with 159 notes

fangirl-life1:

Nine was the best xD

fangirl-life1:

Nine was the best xD

Source: fangirl-life1

10th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Uncreative with 37,607 notes

comradewodka:

sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn
These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.
It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
Men speak more, more often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classrooms, boardrooms, legislative bodies, expert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.
The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”
This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.
Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60′s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off
In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”
 Really, practice those ten words. 
“Stop interrupting me.” 
“I just said that.”
“No explanation needed.”
 

The link about “confusing women’s language with powerless language” is really interesting.

comradewodka:

sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn

These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.

  • It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
  • For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
  • This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
  • As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
  • Men speak moremore often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classroomsboardroomslegislative bodiesexpert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
  • Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
  • Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
  • Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
  • On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.

The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”

This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.

Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off

In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”

 Really, practice those ten words

“Stop interrupting me.” 

“I just said that.”

“No explanation needed.”

 

The link about “confusing women’s language with powerless language” is really interesting.

Source: sorayachemaly